Gordon Lightfoot Book, Music and More!

The home of music journalist Nicholas Jennings, author of Lightfoot, the definitive new Gordon Lightfoot biography from Penguin Random House.

Music Review: Cowboy Junkies - All That Reckoning

Junkies
Canada’s Cowboy Junkies have become one of the world’s most revered bands by whispering while others screamed. The group’s quiet brilliance first gained global acclaim with 1988’s The Trinity Session and the quartet’s subdued rock and country-folk sound has remained remarkably consistent ever since, with occasional segues into noisier moments. On its fine 16 th album, the Junkies—singer Margo Timmins, her brothers Michael and Peter and family friend Alan Anton—shift between loud and soft sounds and personal and social subjects. “The Things We Do to Each Other” is a pulsing, politically charged number that warns how fear can easily turn to hate. “Sing Me a Song” is a 1960s-style rocker, compl...
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Music Review: Rick Astley - Beautiful Life

Rick
The deep-voiced British singer with the high ginger pompadour became a sudden sensation in 1988, when his debut single, the irrepressibly buoyant dance-pop number “Never Gonna Give You Up,” topped the charts in 25 countries. But when the hits dried up, Astley happily retired from music to raise his daughter Emilie with Danish film producer wife Lene Bausager. His return to music eventually resulted in 50 , his first album to reach number one in the U.K. since his debut, Whenever You Need Somebody . Now, to prove his 2016 comeback was no fluke, Astley has returned with his ninth studio album. Like 50 , each of the new 12 tracks are written, produced and played by the Lancashire-born artist. T...
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Music Review: Florence + the Machine - High as Hope

Florence
By now, the world is familiar with the artistry of England’s Florence Welch, the powerful vocalist-frontwoman of the popular indie-rock band that bears her name. She’s partial to laying down her massive, layered gospel voices over soaring orchestral synths and booming percussive flourishes. Less familiar is the more subdued side of the London-born singer. On her band’s fourth album, Welch strips her music back to its bare essentials. “Grace,” a touching tribute to her younger sister, is just piano and vocals. “No Choir,” as the title suggests, also eschews anything but voice and keyboards. There are tracks with lusher instrumentation, including “Hunger,” a confessional about her teenage eati...
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